The Color of Love

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Can you relate? You’re filling out a job application and you hesitate to share your ethnicity for fear of not receiving a call for a interview. “African American woman.” The phrase conjures up a variety of images: sassy career women, wise church women, strong grandmothers, welfare mothers. But how about “chosen vessels?” Or “keys to change?”Perhaps, we need some new images. Women of color have historically been on the bottom of the economic and social ladder. But the paradox of the kingdom of God is that being on the bottom is a plus. God often chooses the rejected and despised to confound the wise and mighty (1 Corinthians 1:27-29). By examining our spiritual history and God-ordained destiny, God can turn the tide of evil in our own lives and the lives of our families, cities and nations. We women of color are chosen vessels. We are significant in the eyes of God.

While writing this journal at 5am I received a text from one of my white sisters in Christ. She and I took a walk this chilly November morning. While walking, talking, and praying, I had many flashbacks of the past. My heart raced, but not because I was with her: she’s a beautiful, loving and kind soul. However, she lives where I didn’t see any street lights and, as beautiful as I’m sure it is in the daytime, I was reminded of the dirt roads in Mississippi and my great-grandfather who would  sometimes share stories of the pain inflicted on our people, black people. While the walk was, at many moments, frightening, I admired how freely she talked and how glorious her personality is while yet wondering how it must feel to be white in America. God made us sisters and created this “sistership” for a reason and I’m starting to understand why. Just like she is chosen by God, so am I. Opportunities afforded to her can be the same to me. I long to live in a world where color is less important than the most important feature: LOVE.

This Post Has 14 Comments

  1. Darryl Baker

    This article is not just for Black Women; it also resonates with me as a Black Man! Thank you for your eloquence, honesty, and transparency.

  2. Meisha Mayo

    Such a good post, as a black woman who’s lived all over the world, I often have that same question. I wouldn’t want to be anything other than a black woman, but it’s good to know I’m not the only one who shares these thoughts and feelings. Thanks for sharing 🤍

  3. Jackie Davis

    This is awesome because I just hate that same question on an application. However, I do answer the question because I know God has my back. And like the song you sing, what God has for me it is for me.

  4. Dynetta

    So I was just with one of my clients Tuesday and I just found out that she was a Hebrew Israelite. She brought up the election and Christianity and then started bashing black churches. Being harsh saying Christians do not follow the laws and how the white people won’t go to heaven and how they can’t be saved. It made me so uncomfortable! I’m so thankful to Pastor that he gave us at the Theology 101 class and Mostly thankful for my relationship with God! It help me to be more apologetic in my walk, I was able to defend the word of God and tell her the truth in love. Although it was an uncomfortable conversation it had to happen. It was a lot of awkward silence after that but I feel like I got Gods point across and I’m sure It made him proud. I feel that our people should try and find a more conservative way to move forward with what happened in the past and just love! God said love covers a multitude of sin and that we are now under grace and not under the law. God loves us that much that he would allow us the gift of grace and mercy and the opportunity to repent to him when we fall short. Thank you for your wisdom and your guidance love you so much♥️♥️♥️

  5. Vincent Burleson

    If we could fully operate and function from Love, without the world getting in the way. Just think about it. Oh to dream.

    Thanks for sharing

    1. Patrice Baker

      I totally agree! #DreamsDoComeTrue
      That’s really my dream!! Thanks for your comment!

  6. Kerri

    I am so thankful that I am given the opportunity to “see through a different lens” each time it’s brought to my attention that MY (white,) lens might be different than anyone elses. Sometimes I need to be reminded. I am so thankful for His Grace, and the grace of his people to gently show me where I fall short. I’m learning every day to LOVE His people more and more. I pray that each of us, with all our different shapes, sizes and colors, can show each other, and ourselves, the mercy and love of Jesus all the time. I was listening to a podcast last week about when Jesus approached the Samarian woman at the well…. she knew INSTANTLY he was a Jew.. he couldn’t hide his outward appearance. We shouldn’t want to hide OUR outward appearance either… it’s so much of our identity! Our differences are just differences… they don’t need to be weapons or ammunition… they don’t HAVE to be points of division. A rose and a daisy are very different, but they’re both beautiful, and they’re both creations of God. I love this blog.

  7. Judy Washington

    Yet another good article. It saddens me too that we may be left with feelings that we might not get past “go” simply because of skin that we are wrapped in. Yet we must persevere because hope is our mantra!. And, after all, Jesus did say in John 16:33, but be of good cheer for I have overcome the world. Therefore,, we can be confident in his prevailing love for all of us, no matter how jaded some have allowed themselves to become through fear and loathing. Yes indeed!

  8. Carolyn

    Yes indeed, love is most important. It allows us to accept everyone regardless of color.

  9. Jasmine Thomas

    Beautiful and very relatable. Even more than simply displaying our race on applications, we have to worry about our hair naturally vs. straight, knowing when to codeswitch without losing that natural twang that makes us, us. Thank God for genuine friendships that help to feed our hope that racial equality is a possibility.

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